Cargill restarts Arkansas turkey plant

  • Article by: MIKE HUGHLETT , Star Tribune
  • Updated: August 16, 2011 - 9:51 PM

The company says it has adopted new safety measures after a salmonella outbreak.

  • 8
  • Comments

  • Results per page:
  • 1 - 8 of 8
doug14Aug. 17, 11 6:36 AM

It's time corporate farmers looked out for the consumer and showed some respect for their livestock. Let's shut this plant down by not buying Cargill products until they change their ways. Buy from local family farms.

5
5
motionbasedAug. 17, 11 8:01 AM

Oh that is horrendous. Really sickening. Animals were not made to live on the earth in such a manner. That is why they sicken and need antibiotics to be kept alive long enough to make meat.The antibiotics cause bacteria to become drug resistant since they do not really control the problem. What are we doing to this earth and these poor animals?!!! We are harming the very fabric of life so that Cargill can be made rich and you can save a buck or two. It's not worth that to me. That is not healthy meat, that is downright vileness. I do not , will not buy meat from Cargill, ever. If you care about animals, the earth and our future you must be compelled to do the same.

3
3
pepsipepsiAug. 17, 11 8:11 AM

I bet Cargill's PR Dept isn't happy about the photo accompanying this article. I'm pretty believe turkeys are raised on concrete floors, not dirt, so it looks like the birds in the photo are covered with powdered sh*t. And they don't look healthy at all. They're young and should be peak physical specimens yet they're missing a lot of feathers. Why? Are they overcrowded, do they fight a lot, or are they sick? It's fitting that the name of Cargill's giant meat business is a double entendre - Cargill Meat Solutions. The answer to tainted meat that sickens and perhaps kills? Just add more chemicals to the cocktail the carcasses are bathed in. Yummy!

6
1
pepsipepsiAug. 17, 11 8:14 AM

I bet Cargill's PR Dept isn't happy about the photo accompanying this article. I'm pretty believe turkeys are raised on concrete floors, not dirt, so it looks like the birds in the photo are covered with powdered sh*t. And they don't look healthy at all. They're young and should be peak physical specimens yet they're missing a lot of feathers. Why? Are they overcrowded, do they fight a lot, or are they sick? It's fitting that the name of Cargill's giant meat business is a double entendre - Cargill Meat Solutions. The answer to tainted meat that sickens and perhaps kills? Just add more chemicals to the cocktail the carcasses are bathed in. Yummy!

2
1
midwestvibeAug. 17, 11 9:21 AM

if you live in Minneapolis, there are so many other choices for you than to support this type of factory farming while risking your family's health. I buy nearly all my meat at my local co-op. If you haven't tried Co-op shopping, give it a shot - it's no longer just for "hippies", it's for smart shoppers who care about real value and quality. They know exactly where the food comes from and what's in it. I remember standing at the meat counter looking at some steaks when one of the butchers came over and suggested a big steak that was on sale because it didn't exactly look like all the others, but I was skeptical. He looked at me very seriously and said "I would never recommend anything to a customer that would make you sick." Contrast that with Cargill, and other industrial concerns, that mix ammonia with ground beef so that it can last a couple more weeks on the shelf, with only an acceptable .001 chance of killing folks. Might cost a few cents more, but I'd rather eat a 12 ounce steak that is safe, healthy and humane than a 16 ounce that comes from God knows where.

3
1
sarazs1Aug. 17, 11 9:40 AM

Mike Hughlett; "The outbreak involves a particularly virulent type of Salmonella Heidelberg that's resistant to several common antibiotics." Salmonella Heidelberg is not resistant to heat. Thorough cooking kills the bacteria, but why put that in the story?

1
1
pepsipepsiAug. 17, 1111:59 AM

Midwest Vibe - I agree that co-ops aren't just for hippies anymore, in fact, a real hippie probably can't afford to shop there. "Sale" price for grass-fed ground beef from Thousand Acres is $5 a pound. Regular price is $7 or $8 and I saw it at $9 in Lunds recently. Most middle income families cannot afford that on a regular basis. Have you found a middle ground between the cheap, generic and potentially dangerous ground beef 'chubs' from Cargill, et al (sourced across the US, Canada and Uruguay and sometimes treated with ammonia and run through a centrifuge-like device) and the premium priced meat from local producers?

1
0
midwestvibeAug. 17, 11 3:15 PM

pepsi - no I don't have much else to suggest, except perhaps linking up with a reputable family farm out towards SD and getting a bulk deal to fill a freezer. I don't have kids yet so it may be easier for us, but the way I see it is maybe I eat out a few times less a month, and pick out simple but cool recipes that cost less overall. We also started an organic garden in our yard, so I rarely pay for herbs and we've got more tomatoes and greens than we can eat right now! It was surprisingly easy to do. We stopped buying soda, energy drinks and garbage which adds up. But I guess part of paying more at the Co-Op is that I see it as "insurance" - they have people researching and sourcing out the food so I don't have to worry about the safety, content or humaneness. In this increasingly industrialized world of food factories, I'm not sure I can put a price on that peace of mind. Obviously the smartest thing would be to buy staples - things like rice, sugar, flour - at the big box stores and spend more on the things that matter, like fresh veggies and meat.

2
0
  • 1 - 8 of 8

Comment on this story   |  

ADVERTISEMENT

Connect with twitterConnect with facebookConnect with Google+Connect with PinterestConnect with PinterestConnect with RssfeedConnect with email newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT