The face of drought

  • Article by: CARYL M. STERN
  • Updated: July 25, 2011 - 6:58 PM
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  • Comments

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  • 1 - 10 of 10
davehougJul. 25, 1111:25 PM

Wouldn't it be even greater if rich Arab countries stepped up to the plate on this famine too?

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jsens3Jul. 26, 11 6:55 AM

I agree with davehoug, and there are many other rich countries who could handle this. Overall it seems that famine in the horn of Africa is quite a common occurrence and many here have "compassion fatigue."

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oftencorrectJul. 26, 1111:02 AM

I think it would make more sense to appeal for an emergency gift from the Gate's Foundation. One billion dollars would feed 2.5 million people for more than a year.

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bwsmithcomJul. 26, 1112:12 PM

I know, let's hold a huge benefit concert where we can raise money to buy them seeds so they can grow their own crops. oh... wait, we did that and they ate the seeds instead of planting them.

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oftencorrectJul. 26, 11 4:09 PM

bwsmithcom - what good would it do to plant seeds in the midst of the worst drought in decades?

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bwsmithcomJul. 26, 11 4:29 PM

Africa needs to learn how to take care of it's own people instead of always playing the victim. Because so much is donated to them (food/clothing), they are unable to setup commercial businesses; I learned this from listening to a Kenyan professor on NPR. If they had planted the seeds back then, they might not be experiencing a drought now. It could similar to the Dust Bowl drought that happened in the midwest after the Great Depression.

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plecksJul. 26, 11 4:31 PM

I think it's China's turn to help for once. They have trillions in surplus whereas the US has nothing but funny money and red ink.

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justmorecrapJul. 27, 11 9:21 AM

My, my, people, even in this civilized country we have devastating droughts (and blizzards). Remember these last several years, when ranchers to the west of use were slaughtering their cattle because they couldn't feed them? This year, it's almighty Texas. Our difference is that we have government "safety nets" that pay our farmers for their losses and help set them up in business again. Our government (R's and D's alike) protects farmers, and we're quite large, so extreme weather never overtakes the whole country at once. I, for one, am willing to help. What I would like to know is how much of my contribution actually buys peanut paste, is this paste that I buy made from American peanuts in an American plant, and is the price paid reasonable to the cost of production (meaning no Halliburton-style mark ups or the peanut version of $6,000 toilet seats)? Can any of you tell me where I can find this information? If I can make a tax deductible contribution that benefits American workers and American corporations in a fair proportion, at the same time, where's the problem?

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bwsmithcomJul. 27, 1110:20 AM

Africa needs to learn how to take care of it's own people instead of always playing the victim. Because so much is donated to them (food/clothing), they are unable to setup commercial businesses; I learned this from listening to a Kenyan professor on NPR. If they had planted the seeds back then, they might not be experiencing a drought now. It could similar to the Dust Bowl drought that happened in the midwest after the Great Depression.

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jhahsJul. 27, 1110:48 AM

Wow, the above comments are depressing. I had already donated to the relief efforts but after reading the editorial, I donated again. If you can afford it, why not help save children from starving.

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