Pillsbury A Mill joins list of places in peril

  • Article by: JENNIFER BJORHUS , Star Tribune
  • Updated: June 15, 2011 - 9:10 AM

The keepers of the list fear "piecemeal development" could harm mill's character, potential.

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SupervonJun. 15, 11 5:32 AM

Basically, the only thing that will encourage developement is cheap land, builldings, materials or labor. Giving away money to preserve is a waste and the government purchasing properties is even worse idea. So, meet any two of the above criteria and you get the place fixed back up. Remember, if you can't turn a profit, why bother?

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solarboy96Jun. 15, 11 5:47 AM

I find it hard to consider a building that is collapsing in on itself a masterpiece of architecture. Masterpieces would be both artistic and functional...functional this structure is not.

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langton4Jun. 15, 11 7:28 AM

"Remember, if you can't turn a profit, why bother?" There are all kinds of reasons other than "profit" for doing things--whether it's preserving a piece of our history or providing for those who need help. There are moral, ethical and purely practical reasons for doing things as well as financial ones.

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strib37Jun. 15, 11 7:30 AM

The Strib, or someone else, should consider doing a series on the history of the redevelopment of this parcel with a focus on the various players, including, the various developers, city council members, neighborhood activists, and others. I don't mean to praise or curse any of those players, but there was a lot of energy spent to arrive at the project which fell victim to the housing crisis. It's a case study in how the city works (or doesn't). If there had not been delay, maybe there would have been one huge eyesore on the riverfront. Maybe the delay prevented the construction of many unsold units sitting in litigation. What lessons have been learned? I have my opinions and they are very biased. I'd really like to see someone dig into all the facets behind the story, especially the role of the neighborhood association, city council members, and the developers. It took years to get to where we are now. I remember how happy some city council members were with the final plans.... before they fell through. Are any of the same folks involved in Block E, or other projects?

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langton4Jun. 15, 11 7:30 AM

"I find it hard to consider a building that is collapsing in on itself a masterpiece of architecture." Where did you get the idea that the mill is "collapsing in on itself?" It isn't.

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essdee09Jun. 15, 11 7:33 AM

@solarboy, the East Bank Mills developers owned the building for several years (now their bank does). East Bank probably didn't want to spend any money before they had it. And you've probably seen how most banks take care of foreclosed properties. No surprise to me that a lack of maintenance is causing these kinds of problems.

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djjaelahJun. 15, 11 8:20 AM

The Vacant parcel of land has been used as a snow dump for the last few years. All the toxic snow melt chemicals and sand are left on the lot to pollute the area. The sand is several inches thick. There are large potholes and a sharp broken chain fence on the site. Poor management of the site has mad it an eyesore and toxic dump. Thanks BNC Bank!

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nordeastmplsJun. 15, 11 8:31 AM

Certainly making it into affordable apartments with a revolving door of renters will keep this property in pristine condition once it is developed. I think this property has way more potential than apartments. Could someone with some vision please step in.

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eincksJun. 15, 11 9:19 AM

To Whom it May Concern, The Mill District and this particular building have a history of global proportion that goes back 200 years. Please consider the significance of what would be destroyed if we let Pillsbury A go any further in to disrepair. There was a time when St. Anthony Main was a hopping retail and entertainment complex. I believe at the time, Pillsbury A was still a functioning mill. This area needs new life. I know we have other needs as well, but please don't let this beautiful, old relic of industrial fortitude crumble in to oblivion.

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liberaleliteJun. 15, 11 9:35 AM

Supervon: cheap land encourages development? That's *sort of* been true in the past, and it's less true now. If cheap land brought development, why aren't the Dakotas or Wyoming filling up fast?

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