'Political correctness' and Lake Calhoun

  • Article by: H. LEE CHEEK JR. and SEAN R. BUSICK
  • Updated: June 7, 2011 - 9:09 PM
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themarshotelJun. 7, 11 9:18 PM

Absolutely. Leave existing place names alone. This generation will have their chance to name future streets and new communities after their stand-up heroes, who will consist of forced redistributionists, illegal immigrants, gay activists, and hard core, racist rappers who promote cop killing and general misogyny. We've a great future to look forward to!

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LakeliverJun. 7, 1110:18 PM

Well, how could I possibly compete with the inane name calling and self-righteousness of the first post? Strangely enough, I agree that the name should be left alone, as much as I admire HH. As for the rest of themarshotel's post, it shows a remarkable lack of any class or significant meaning. The argument could have been made without satisfying what can only be seen as hatred and small-mindedness. People are used to Calhoun and it just would not seem right to change the name. As a matter of fact, I think HH would agree because he was a man of class and loved this state and its well-known places.

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fisherman17Jun. 7, 1110:25 PM

themarshotel-wow--I agree with quite a bit of what you're saying, heck, almost all of it, since we lack integrity-driven, motivated leaders, but that is quite a vent ready to go!

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ollie3Jun. 7, 1110:55 PM

And while we're at it, can we stop this silly idea of taking US Grant off of the $50 bill and replacing him with a guy who wold weapons to our enemies in Iran?

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daltrowitzJun. 7, 1110:58 PM

I caught my first fish on Lake Calhoun. So did my father and my daughter. My grandfather wrote a column about life on Lake Calhoun. I do not like much of what John Calhoun represented, but changing the name would just take away too many memories.

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dahutysJun. 8, 1112:02 AM

Why am I not surprised that people from Alabama write an article to passionately defend someone who called slavery a 'positive good'?

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garagewineJun. 8, 1112:27 AM

Leave it alone. Humphrey's name was already placed on the Metrodome and one of the airport terminals. How much more recognition does a vice president really deserve?

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noggnbloggnJun. 8, 11 3:11 AM

Interesting piece. The authors mentioned the 'Triumvirate': Calhoun, Clay, and Webster. It is ironic perhaps that a school in St. Paul, formerly named for Daniel Webster, had it's name changed to Barack and Michelle Obama Service School (or something like that), after Obama had only been in office a short while. Calhoun believed in seperation of power, for the greater good of the country. Obama seems to believe in consolidating federal power (particularly the executive branch) over the individual, over the states, yet looks to give more authority to the U.N. and internatonal organizations. Go figure.

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quitwhiningJun. 8, 11 3:34 AM

This article is not very persuasive. Calhoun is great because he was a cabinet person or a Senator (not from Minnesota) for a long time? Did he accomplish something significant to our history/progress as a coumtry? Even according to the article he wanted states to make their own decisions about racism and slavery, which was the single worst policy that our country ever allowed. It is also not a very strong argument to say that we should keep the name simply because people are used to it. Minnesota has one of the strongest records in the country of sending soldiers to fight against slavery in the civil war. Perhaps we should consider giving more respect to the ultimate sacrifice that Minnesota soldiers made. It is legitimate to say that we should at least consider changing the name from Calhoun.

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johlawJun. 8, 11 4:19 AM

If we don't want, as the article stated, "The advocates of political correctness want to corrupt history for temporary political gains.." then perhaps we need to reestablish the teaching of U.S. History as core curriculum. Hide a country's history by not teaching and passing it on and you will steal the future of that country through the ignorance of it's citizens.

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