Consultant takes 'green' dry-cleaning plunge

  • Article by: TODD NELSON , Special to the Star Tribune
  • Updated: April 10, 2011 - 9:16 PM

Unhappy with traditional dry cleaning and eager to run his own company, Dan Miller left McKinsey & Co. to open Mulberrys Garment Care.

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david999Apr. 11, 11 1:08 AM

Kinda neat they use carbon dioxide to clean clothes. At one time I used to run 4 dry cleaning machines at a industrial laundry and hated the smell of the solvent, especially when a pump went bad and sprayed the solvent everywhere until a valve was shut :).... BTW carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas according to the tree huggers and will destroy the planet. I wonder if they will picket this guys business?

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miltrainerApr. 11, 11 2:05 PM

I wouldn't consider using CO2 as being green. Funny how being green takes on a whole new meaning. Is it really green? Depends on who you ask.

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ashleyamApr. 11, 11 2:52 PM

CO2 is a natural occurring gas in our atmosphere produced by plants and other living things. Mulberrys takes the already present gas and recycles it to clean garments. The CO2 that we use is the same CO2 that you will find in any carbonated beverage. Using CO2 truly is the greenest way.

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reader15Apr. 11, 11 7:22 PM

It causes global warming. Or global climate change. Or something. All I know is that the polar bears won't have any more ice because of this method of dry cleaning.

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chrissylApr. 12, 11 7:44 PM

I would examine the incremental benefit that it's providing to the environment and consumer. Is there an optimal to dry clean or do anything that doesn't cause some type of side effect? Since Dan's business is using a much less harmful technique to dry clean, the amount of damage that a dry cleaning business would do by using perc is eliminated.

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dgmiller100Apr. 13, 1112:27 PM

Just to be clear Mulberrys uses recycled CO2 and reuses it multiple times in our system. So, we're actually using CO2 that would have gone into the atmosphere, containing it, and then using it to clean clothes. After each cleaning load, the CO2 is sent back into the tanks and reused on the next load. So, overall there is a net reduction in CO2 in the atmosphere because of our cleaning process. This will actually reduce the impact on global warming.,

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rbrown21Apr. 15, 1111:23 AM

This is a major case of greenwashing. This is NOT a process which cleans with CO2, notwithstanding the claims of the cleaner. The process that this particular cleaner uses is trademarked "Solvair" it uses Glycol Ether to clean - and CO2 is just a rinsing agent! For more details on this particular solvent see: http://www.sfenvironment.org/downloads/library/2__oehha_memo_on_alternative_dry_cleaning_solvents__2010.pdf Don't be taken by false advertizing! Reginald Brown

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