Town Car owner unable to get cruise under control

  • Article by: PAUL BRAND , Star Tribune
  • Updated: March 6, 2011 - 4:01 PM
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enonormanMar. 10, 11 5:26 AM

Lincoln Town Car, This has what is refereed to as an ambiguous system. That is there are two inputs which will disengage the cruse control. The first is the brake light circuit. Check to see if the cruse control servo getting the electrical signal to turn off the cruse control. Your brake lights can remain working but the cruse function may not disengage. Anyone that has worked on these systems know that if the brake lights are not electrically functioning, the system will not engage, not not engage. This might be as simple as one brake light bulb burned out. The second, which is a back up is a brake line pressure switch which is normally closed switch and when sufficient pressure is applied the circuit opens and turns the cruse off. This sounds like what is happening in your vehicle. Ford dealers have in there shop manual, a trouble shooting tree, which the symptom is listed and the tests and results determine the problem. The repair procedure is also explained. Some of the systems use a tester that when installed in series with the cruse control module you are directed through a series of actions, switches, brake switch, and steering wheel, with the results of the test displayed by the tester at the conclusion of the test. There is no substitute for a factory shop manual and a factory prescribed test equipment.

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enonormanMar. 10, 11 6:01 AM

98 Chevy, If the lights, horn, function normal with the key on engine off, but then dim or do not function at all in the start mode, a likely cause is the fly wheel area, bell housing, is filled with ice. If the motor itself or the Bendix drive were frozen, rocking the truck in gear, will have no effect as the bendix drive is only engaged on a rotating starter. If you have to engage the starter and then rock the truck, the motor itself might be filled with ice. A stalled motor becomes a direct short resulting in the dim lights and no horn. If the battery cables become warm when attempting to start a short circuit is likely. If they do not get warm, a high resistance in the battery cable circuit is suspect. A voltage drop of the battery cables will determine where an open or high resistance in the circuit might be. This will have to be done with a load, the starting circuit engaged, to get valid results. Remember that current flows from negative to positive and the ground cables are as important as the positive cable. The most likely cause would be a connection point and if my memory serves me correctly, there were some concerns with the attachment of the battery connectors to the battery cable. These would show up as a bulge in the insulation near the battery cable end and when cut open corrosion had built up between the wire and the connector. Simple electrical trouble shooing exercise and all you really need is a fair quality volt meter and a simple logical thought procedure.

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