Living (not so) large?

  • Article by: KIM PALMER , Star Tribune
  • Updated: October 19, 2010 - 2:46 PM

The 'bigger is better' mantra has ruled the home front for decades. Now there are signs that a smaller aesthetic is emerging. Houses are starting to shrink -- but our stuff hasn't caught up yet.

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gojohnnygoOct. 19, 10 9:18 PM

...glad to see some of you are finally catching up to my way of thinking...I've been operating this way for many years out of choice. McMansions seem to represent The Great Big American Gross-Out at its very worst.

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knowneck00Oct. 19, 1011:28 PM

Dem's need the rest to pay unemployment, and food stamps for all those people working for cash. Ah yes. Spreading the wealth.

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rockanatreeOct. 20, 10 5:35 AM

Well, duh. Americans can be so stupid sometimes.

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ivanatorOct. 20, 10 6:54 AM

There is nothing more ugly than the 3000+ sq. ft. suburban snout-nosed home, with it's protruding 3 car garage; it's tacky, thin, feeble, Home Depot architectural appointments, small windows, and walkout basement. A bunch of stupids trying to impress the stupids. Too bad real architecture is reserved for the wealthy.

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AuctionmanOct. 20, 10 6:57 AM

We raised four children in a 1,400 square foot house and never felt deprived. It had what we needed and we learned how to get along with each other. We have always lived modestly and will continue that way. Less stress, less cost, less cleaning, less maintenance and more time for important things like fishing and golfing! You can keep your mansion... I'll keep my sanity.

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marqy2Oct. 20, 10 7:22 AM

Those Mcmansions are very easily divided into either duplexes or 4 plexes....guaranteed some suburb zoning committee going to be getting this request soon.......pay attention Woodbury.

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jqpublicOct. 20, 10 8:06 AM

We've been here before. For those of you who were paying attention in the 80's the same mantra was being repeated then. Drive through a neighborhood constructed in the 80's and notice the considerably smaller size. Once the economy picked up the size of the houses went back up. Call me a pessimist but I'd be surprised if this "enlightenment" doesn't fade like the last one. We are after all creatures of habit(at).

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waywaysOct. 20, 10 8:11 AM

Why heat and cool a seperate room that just sits there empty, collecting dust? Next up, guest room. How many times do you really have a guest stay in that room? Why heat and cool a guest room that just sits there empty, collecting dust? My parents had guests come a couple of times during my whole childhood. It was usually out of town family members that came to attend a wedding or funeral. The 'guests' stayed in my parents room and my parents stayed on a fold up bed in the basement. I do agree with two bathrooms. Sometimes an unplanned nature call comes when it's not your turn in the main bathroom. Open rooms, I've always disliked them. My last two homes have had the livingroom and kitchen open to eachother. It is nice for some things, but annoying for others. When the TV is on, it needs to be turned up so loud because there is no wall for the sound to bounce off of and fill the room. The TV can barely be heard in the livingroom but is blasting in the bedrooms at the other end of the house. With the open rooms, there is no private phone calls or phone calls that are seperate from whoever is watching TV in the livingroom. The stereo is in the kitchen and can't be used if it's TV time because the two fight over eachother. A WALL would end all of those things. One nice thing is, when it's a holiday, it's nice to have both rooms for family to gather and be able to visit from the kitchen to the livingroom. But how often is that? Only one to three times a year where as the other things are daily. A masterbedroom should fit a queen bed, nightstand(s), two dressers, small chair, and a blanket chest with walking space, no bigger. Childrens bedrooms should fit a full size bed, nightstand, a dresser, a desk and a toy chest, no bigger. What does all this need for square footage? I would guess 1000 to 1500 on the main living for a three bedroom, two bath home and then a basement. Mainfloor laundry is a must and kitchens should be big enough to eat in with a pantry and the basement is for utility and whatever else.

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oldgulyOct. 20, 10 8:17 AM

Live in a first tier suburb...1100 square which includes the family room. Lot 50x150. Maximize what you have...remodeled my kitchen, cannot believe it feels larger...didn't even add an footage. Second, we are always together...never far to look for my toddlers...they are always right around the corner.

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hecklerOct. 20, 10 9:10 AM

I know too many people that live the material life to mask the insecurities they really have. Its all about wearing your status on your sleeve... they are fake. Give me a real person who will enjoy the free things in life and not worry about upgrading car after 2 years cause the neighbors did, gigantic empty house, 8 ton vehicle that gets 4/mpg.

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