How garnishment works in Minnesota

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  • Updated: September 1, 2010 - 8:07 AM
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jrock612Sep. 1, 10 9:39 AM

Actually 25% of the debtors disposable income can be garnished.

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mgmSep. 1, 1012:21 PM

Garnishment isn't pretty, but really it's never pretty when people have to be forced to be adults and handle their lives.

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Bubba2mSep. 1, 10 1:02 PM

"you get to keep 75 percent of net wages or 40 times the federal minimum wage, whichever is greater". Do some people just not read, or is it a math or comprehension problem???

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ladygeekSep. 1, 10 1:37 PM

Some people really do intend to repay debt but once they lose their jobs, homes, income, etc., there is no option and if you can't pay, you can't pay. There are so many unemployed people (the actual number is hard to determine because they only count people receiving UI benefits), who have difficulty even covering their rent and some people end up sleeping in their cars (if they have one) or a shelter or outside. But then you probably are one of those who seem to think that people want to stay on UI instead of working. That is an utter lie perpetrated by the wealthy and their minions. I certainly don't like receiving UI benefits but then my IT job was moved to India thanks to the corporate executives that rake in record salaries and bonuses for laying off thousands of workers.

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mgmSep. 1, 10 2:34 PM

ladygeek - Garnishment has nothing to do with homeless people, are you saying that now they're garnishing wages from the homeless too? It says in plain old font above that UI benefits are not garnishable, so I have zero idea what your personal drama has to do with any of this. Also, good try at using your powers to determine what my personal opinion of people taking UI benefits are .. but swing & a miss. Good try.

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bubba5Sep. 1, 10 7:25 PM

that child support and IRS/state get first crack at that money. Its a major time waster for the HR/payroll when we have to get involved in this stuff - sometimes actually having to break the news that there will be a garnishment. Add to that the forms and worksheets and phone calls from collections/"lawyers". Will go to bat though for the employee as much as we can (but our hands are often tied with this stuff).

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bippy742Sep. 1, 10 8:35 PM

I think you're twisting ladygeek's words a little.

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adamh2oSep. 1, 10 9:21 PM

That doesn't even make sense. Assuming you made less than $300 an hour, 40 times the federal minimum wage would be greater than the 75%, so you could keep the first $290 each hour that you made. And I'm sure that's not how it works.

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