Our Hungry Planet: Golden eggs

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Good job. This is the sort of reporting I like to see from the Star Trib: issue-based and rooted in genuine concern and real life impact.

posted by beckwith10 on Dec. 6, 08 at 11:00 PM | 
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Boycott eggs.. or have a national "no egg eating" day.

posted by shaun102578 on Dec. 7, 08 at 1:38 AM | 
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Quit complaining! Eggs are still one of the cheaper things out there. A lot more important things to worry about and for that matter write about!

posted by j_m_t_us on Dec. 7, 08 at 2:19 AM | 
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What if everyone takes a tour of one of these factory barns before deciding which eggs to buy next time. "Hens produce more given just a little more space" sounds like more than hippie propaganda.

posted by beingfamous on Dec. 7, 08 at 2:41 AM | 
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In college I had a few friends who had chicken coops in their back yards. They had four or five chickens from which they would get their eggs and, in rare cases, fresh meat. The Minneapolis City Code allows residents to keep chickens as long as they pay an annual $30 fee to the city. Other cities, such as Edina, do not charge residents, but have strict regulations on where on your property a coop can be built. Obviously, there is also the need to invest in a safe and protective coop, but even after such investments, the cost of the coop and the annual $30 a year is a low price to pay for year-round eggs. If, as the article states, free-range eggs are over $3/dozen, it would seem that owning a small flock of chickens would be a smarter alternative...just as long as you're aware of the work you have to put in to maintain them.

posted by bjberesf on Dec. 7, 08 at 2:45 AM | 
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Did you notice that a lawsuit basically forced producers to downsize their flocks resulting in increased egg prices. Then, the producers get sued again on allegations of price fixing. On top of it all, producers are afraid to build because of laws (b/c of lawsuits) being enacted in CA. I say the Democrats outlaw all of these lawsuits. Whoops, I forgot, Obama, Biden, the Clinton's, Edwards are all lawyers

posted by milkman on Dec. 7, 08 at 6:23 AM | 
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Did you notice that there are 3-10 hens in each 67" square cage? THAT is the inhumane part. They are bred to be egg producing machines that are sent to soup after 1 year. I have a flock of 50 chickens that run around eating bugs and getting sunshine in the summer, and are in a coop in the winter, where they have a lot of room. Just a generation or two ago, our meat, milk and eggs came from animals that got sunshine and grass. Now we eat food from confined animals that live on concrete and are forced to produce until they are worn out, then are slaughtered. I have a few acres, and we have 4-year-old chickens that are still producing. We have a cow that is twice the age of the average-she is eight and producing. It makes more sense to have more people producing on smaller farms. Growing animals give off more carbon. If older animals produce longer, they are kept in the herd, hence less carbon. Less fuel is used to harvest crops to feed animals and spread manure year around, if they are on pasture. Many people would prefer to eat local, fresh and humane if possible. If I were selling eggs (I give away several dozen a week), I could easily sell them for the same or less than the grocery store and still make a profit-just not a big one.

posted by rbmccoy on Dec. 7, 08 at 7:25 AM | 
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I was struck by two points in the article; the number of egg producers declined by 90% with 250 producers producing 95% of the eggs (another ag monopoly) and second, that 80% of the egg producers voluntarily gave more space so it must be economically feasible regardless of the protestations of "dozens of experts". Having our own free range hens, we get more eggs than we could use and the eggs taste so much better than commercial eggs. Try a real egg sometime. You'll never go back to commercial.

posted by millarscor on Dec. 7, 08 at 7:41 AM | 
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We need the government to Centralize planning in so many areas; food, fuel, schools, media etc.... Minnesota would not have a deficit if it could take what it needed. I AM THANKFUL FOR OBAMA AND I HOPE THE DEMOCRATS CENTRALIZE PLANNING AND CONTROL !!!!!!!

posted by correctman on Dec. 7, 08 at 7:48 AM | 
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$2.29 for a carton of eggs? where in the world is he buying these eggs? i get a carton of eggs for $1.69 or cheaper. this week eggs are on sale for $.99 a dozen. holy cow man, do some searching for the best price before you go shopping.

posted by edoggy31 on Dec. 7, 08 at 8:02 AM | 
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